HOME ABOUT CONTACT AVAILABLE ISSUES SUBSCRIBE MEDIA & ADS CONFERENCE CALENDAR
LATEST UPDATES » Vol 21, No 11, November 2017 – Paediatric Illnesses       » Breakthrough new rice variety announced in Northern China       » Ebola vaccine approved in China       » Study reveals anti-cancer properties of a fungus used in traditional medicine       » Chinese scientists create genetically modified low-fat pigs       » China, Brazil and Russia are riskiest markets for compliance and regulation       » Why are Korean eggs salmonella-free?      
EYE ON CHINA
Study reveals anti-cancer properties of a fungus used in traditional medicine
Scientists found an interaction between two anti-cancer compounds in the fungus Cordyceps militaris.

Chinese scientists have found evidence that a fungus used in traditional Chinese medicine, widely sought by the public for its healing powers, also carries anti-cancer benefits.

The scientists found there was an interaction between two anti-cancer compounds in the fungus Cordyceps militaris.

The first, cordycepin, was noted in Cordyceps militaris in 1950, but how it interacted remained unknown. The second, pentostatin, was first identified from a bacterium and was developed as a commercial drug to treat leukemia and other cancers in the 1990s.

Their research found that biosynthesis of cordycepin is coupled with pentostatin production by a single gene cluster.

"For the first time, we decoded the biosynthesis mechanism of cordycepin in the fungus, and during the research we unexpectedly discovered pentostatin," said Wang Chengshu, head of the research team at the Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, a branch of the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

"These two compounds coexist in fungal cells in the form of a protector and protege - cordycepin is synthesized with the coupled production of pentostatin to protect the stability of the former," he said.

Their research also showed that the fungus initiates a detoxification process when the cordycepin in the body reaches an excessively high level, which can be toxic.

"It reminds us that excessive intake of the fungus may not be healthy," Wang said.

A paper about the team's findings after nearly eight years of research was published in the journal Cell Chemical Biology.

Cordyceps militaris, bright orange-yellow mushrooms are sold as a fresh supplement for soups and stews, is a much more affordable alternative to caterpillar fungus.

"However, in the research, we have proved that neither of the compounds is produced in caterpillar fungus," Wang said.

Cordyceps fungi are popular in China for their widely believed immunity-enhancing and energy-strengthening properties. Their uses in medical treatment date to the Compendium of Materia Medica, a book widely deemed the encyclopedia of traditional Chinese medicine written in the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).

Source: China Daily, Xinhua

Click here for the complete issue.

NEWS CRUNCH  
news Novogen becomes Kazia Therapeutics
news Transforming healthcare through innovation: addressing unmet healthcare needs in Asia Pacific
news 77% of healthcare leaders believe they need to be a digital business to succeed: Microsoft study
PR NEWSWIRE  
Asia Pacific Biotech News
EDITORS' CHOICE  

Lady Ganga: Nilza'S Story
COLUMNS  
Subscribe to APBN E-Newsletter
Find us under 'Others' option to receive APBN e-newsletters thrice a month!

APBN Editorial Calendar 2017
January:
Healthcare Focus: LUNGS
February:
War on CANCER
March:
Get to Know TCM
April:
Diabetes: The Big Picture
May:
The Piece of Your Mind - Brain Health/Science
June:
Advocacies in Support of Rare Disease Patients
July:
Food Science & Technology
August:
Eye – the Window to your Soul
September:
Infectious Diseases
October:
A change of heart — Cardiovascular diseases
November:
Paediatric Illnesses
December:
Skin Diseases/Allergic Reactions
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
MAGAZINE TAGS
About Us
Events
Available issues
Editorial Board
Letters to Editor
Instructions to Authors
Advertise with Us
CONTACT
World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.
5 Toh Tuck Link, Singapore 596224
Tel: 65-6466-5775
Fax: 65-6467-7667
» For Editorial Enquiries:
   biotech_edit@wspc.com or Ms Lim Guan Yu
» For Subscriptions, Advertisements &
   Media Partnerships Enquiries:
   biotech_ad@wspc.com
Copyright© 2017 World Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd  •  Privacy Policy