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LATEST UPDATES » Vol 23, No 05, May 2019 – What's Cracking Antibodies in ostrich eggs       » China to amend healthcare laws       » First "one-minute clinic" in China university       » Australian gene-editing rules adopt 'middle ground'       » Brexit leads to 25 per cent decline in UK clinical trials       » Wheat that fights celiac disease      
EYE ON CHINA
CRISPR gene-editing not as precise as thought, warns of safety risks
Research found popular gene-editing tool likely to cause off-target mutations

Chinese scientists found that a popular gene-editing tool may lead to wide off-target mutations, warning of serious clinical safety risks of the gene-editing technique.

The study published in Science showed that a type of base editor used to convert DNA base pairs caused high numbers of off-target mutations in the genomes of mouse embryos.

CRISPR-Cas9 is a revolutionary genome-editing tool developed in recent years that enabled researchers to edit parts of the genome by removing, adding or altering sections of the DNA sequence.

It is a simple, versatile and precise method of genetic manipulation but may introduce errors outside of the target locations, causing concerns of leading to cancers if being carelessly applied clinically.

Scientists led by Yang Hui from the Institute of Neuroscience of Chinese Academy of Sciences created a new off-target testing method called GOTI to test BE3, a single-base gene editor based on CRISPR-Cas9.

They found the off-target mutations partially took place at cancer-inhibiting genes, previously believed highly unlikely to take place, demonstrating that the technique is inappropriate to be used clinically.

Off-target effects are the largest source of risks for gene-editing technology, but no method could accurately predict those risks previously.

Many genetic diseases are caused by single-base mutations, according to the researchers.

"The single-base gene-editing method was believed to be safe but the new testing tool showed the contrary, so we should make clinical standards as soon as possible to ensure the safety of gene-editing technique," said Yang.

Source: Xinhua

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EDITORS' CHOICE  
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APBN Editorial Calendar 2019
January:
Taiwan Medical tourism
February:
Marijuana as medicine — Legal marijuana will open up scientific research
March:
Driven by curiosity
April:
Career developments for researchers
May:
What's cracking — Antibodies in ostrich eggs
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
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