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BIOBOARD - UNITED STATES
Fibrocell/UCLA study on human skin cells yields promising results
Fibrocell Science, Inc announced that its research collaboration with UCLA has resulted in a discovery that may lead to a more predictable, commercially viable method of producing stable, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from adult skin cells. The study has been accepted for publication in the Stem Cell Research and Therapy peer-reviewed journal and the provisional paper is available online. It was conducted under the guidance of James Byrne, PhD, assistant professor, UCLA Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research.

“We continue to be pleased with the results of our collaboration with UCLA to pursue the full potential of fibroblasts,” said David Pernock, CEO and Board Chair, Fibrocell Science.

The cells may be used by academic researchers and pharmaceutical companies to evaluate new drug compounds for safety and to develop patient-specific therapies for multiple disease states, including heart disease, Parkinson's disease and diabetes. Using skin cells is more advantageous to the patient than obtaining cells from bone marrow or adipose tissue (fat). A skin biopsy is quicker to perform, less painful and minimally invasive.

Dr. Byrne's study found human skin cells cultured in the presence of a chemical known as BAY11 resulted in reproducible increased expression of the OCT4 gene that did not inhibit normal cell growth. OCT4 is involved in many cell processes, but is primarily known to maintain pluripotency and regulate cell differentiation. It is typically used as a marker to identify undifferentiated cells.

The development of a more stable method to create iPS cells from skin cells allows for the potential of a reproducible commercial manufacturing process. The study was performed at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research and Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology at UCLA in conjunction with the Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience at Rutgers University.

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APBN Editorial Calendar 2018
January:
Obesity / Outlook for 2018
February:
Searching for the fountain of youth
March:
Women in Science - Making a difference
April:
Digestive health in the 21st century - Trust your guts
May:
Dental health - The root to good health
June:
Oncology / Biotech landscape in APAC
July:
Water management / Vaccination
August:
Regenerative medicine / Biotech start ups
September:
Digital healthcare / 3D printing
October:
Bones / Breast cancer
November:
Liver health / Top science research nations & institutions
December:
AIDS / Breakthrough of the year/Emerging trends
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
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