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BIOBOARD - UNITED STATES
Gene x3 helps corn grow in acidic soil
A genetic variation makes it possible for corn to grow in soil that contains high levels of aluminum, a chemical that is toxic to many plants.

Approximately 30% of the world's total land is too acidic to support crop production, but certain strands of corn growing in tropical and subtropical areas have three copies of a particular gene that make them more tolerant.

The triplicate gene may ultimately be used to breed or genetically modify plants to adapt to soil containing high levels of aluminum.

“Identifying genes that make plants more tolerant of aluminum is very critical for farmers growing crops where productivity is suboptimal due to acidic soil,” says Matias Kirst, assistant professor in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Florida.

In plants, tolerance to aluminum is a phenotype — a trait such as growth, physiology, and yield. It has been long suspected that multiple gene copies determine certain phenotypes, but this is the first actual proof, Kirst says.

“This is the first time copy number variation has been shown to affect a phenotype in plants. From now on, people will be paying more attention to this type of variation to identify and explain traits.”

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the findings suggest that the changes in gene copy number may be a rapid evolutionary response to new environments or climate change.

The fact that genome changes are still happening today, after the domestication of maize, is relevant, says lead author Lyza Maron, a research associate at Cornell University.

“That has implications for adaptation. It's important, more than ever, that we can breed crops in a changing environment.”

Source: University of Florida

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APBN Editorial Calendar 2016
January:
Guest Editorial - Biotechnology In Korea
February:
Guest Editorial - Biomedical Research Governance
March:
Guest Editorial - Life-Saving Opportunities: A Guide to Regenerative Medicine
April:
Leading-Edge ONCOLOGY
May:
Healthcare Systems & Policies in Asia
June:
Medical Devices & Healthcare Technology
July:
Water Technology and Management
August:
Novel Technologies for Antibody Drug Discovery in Japan
September:
Infectious Diseases
October:
Medical Tourism
November:
Big Data in Healthcare
December:
Orthopaedics
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
– Editor: Carmen, Jia Wen Loh
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