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EYE on CHINA
China plans research centres to aid developing world
The Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) is planning a major new drive to extend science cooperation with developing countries, including setting up research centres outside China, as well as new offices of The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS) within China.

Senior officers at CAS have told SciDev.Net that the details of the initiatives are still under discussion, though some centers have already been launched, such as the 'China-Chile Joint Research Center for Astronomy' in February.

The move follows last year's election of the first Chinese president of TWAS, Bai Chunli, who is also the president of China's science academy.

"International cooperation is very important for CAS, and as the new president of TWAS, we have more opportunity to cooperate with other developing countries," Bai Chunli tells SciDev.Net.

The planned new TWAS centers within China, which are still under discussion, will aim to promote the cooperation and exchange of science, and the training of scientists.

CAS is also planning to launch a program to train hundreds of new PhD students, as well as senior scholars from developing countries at the Chinese research institutions. Last month, as part of the program, the academy called for applications for a new CAS-TWAS President's Fellowship Program, which will offer 140 scholars a year from developing countries a chance to do PhDs in China.

CAS's first overseas research center is planned to be in Kenya and will be jointly established with the Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, but the details and budget for the initiative are still in discussion.

Mohamed Hag Ali Hassan, treasurer of TWAS and co-chair of the IAP (the global network of science academies), tells SciDev.Net that the CAS research center in Africa is a "fascinating initiative" that will bring substantial benefits to both scientific and development communities in Africa.

He says that the center should prioritize training a new generation of talented African researchers in Chinese laboratories by linking postgraduate education to key interdisciplinary research areas.

It should also establish a network of collaborating institutions in Africa with expertise in these research areas to promote scientific exchanges and the center鈥檚 visibility in Africa, says Hassan.

"The center should encourage and support research projects that aim at generating and applying frontier scientific knowledge to solve specific, real-life problems facing Africa," he says.

S. Samar Hasnain, professor of molecular biophysics at the University of Liverpool, United Kingdom, and a member of TWAS, says: "The opening of the first CAS office in Africa, often a neglected continent, with the aim of increasing science and higher education cooperation, is visionary".

Hans van Ginkel, professor of geography at Utrecht University, the Netherlands and a TWAS member, says this "is a great step forward" towards strengthening scientific capacities in developing countries.

"Both the [CAS] centers in developing countries and the TWAS centers in China for academics from developing countries could serve this purpose well," he says.

But van Ginkel warns that it will be important for the initiatives to strengthen substantially the scientific capacity in the developing countries.

China is increasingly becoming recognized for its innovations and their applications in developing countries.

For example, in a speech this month at the Boao Forum for Asia Annual Conference 2013, China, Bill Gates, co-chair and trustee of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, said the country's scientific breakthroughs can help Africa and less developed countries battle epidemics, hunger and poverty, Xinhua news agency reported.

"The breakthrough science and technology that's happening here in China can help the poorest people in the world lead healthier, more productive lives," Gates said.

Li Jiao
Source: Science Development Network

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EDITORS' CHOICE  

Credits to: American Chemical Society
COLUMNS  

APBN Editorial Calendar 2015
Trends and Predictions for 2015 Robotics in Healthcare Nutrition Universal Health Coverage
Start-Up Biotech Companies Preventative and Translational Medicine Biofuels ASEAN Economic Community and Asia's Life Sciences Industry
Big Data: Healthcare and Drug Development Antibody Engineering in Japan Christmas Edition
APBN Editorial Calendar 2016
Korea's Biotechnology Industry Nutrition and Allergies: Are we, Too Clean? Medical Devices and Technology: Innovation that leaves an Inspiration Tobacco Smoking: The 'Real' Cost of One Cigarette
Life-Saving Opportunities: A Guide to Regenerative Medicine Occupational Health Water Technology Olympics: Evolution of Sports
Respiratory: Seasonal flu viruses
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