HOME ABOUT CONTACT AVAILABLE ISSUES SUBSCRIBE MEDIA & ADS CONFERENCE CALENDAR
LATEST UPDATES » Vol 20, No 12, December 2016 – Medical Imaging Technology       » Climate Change Could Hurt Coffee, Help Banana Production       » Partnerships and Innovation: Shaping the Future of Healthcare in Asia Pacific       » Chugai's Novel Antibody Technologies Put Singapore at the Centre of Fight Against Disease       » NUS Scientists Discover the "Switch" that Makes Breast Cancer Cells Aggressive      
BIOBOARD - NORTH AMERICA
Protein helps colon cancer move and invade
Previous studies show that the km23-1 protein is involved in the movement of cancer cells and in the control of specific proteins at the leading edge of moving cells. A new study shows that km23-1 is used in the cancer cell's ability to move out of a tumor in the early stages of invasion.

“Km23-1 may be able to help in this process due to its role in the assembly of large groups of proteins favorable to cancer invasion,” says Kathleen Mulder, Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Penn State.

The researchers limited the amount of km23-1 available in the cells they studied, which allowed them to see how it affects cell behavior.

A reduction in km23-1 caused a decrease in the production of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). In healthy cells, TGF-beta helps prevent cancer growth. However, in cancer cells, the protein actually aids in the spread of tumors. Limiting the protein also blocks the activity of proteins previously shown to lead to TGF-beta production.

In the study, reported in the journal PLOS ONE, the researchers also show that cells with less km23-1 have reduced amounts of a protein that forms a framework structure associated with the spread of cancer. This scaffolding holds together key factors that help the cancer cells move and invade to form secondary tumors.

By decreasing km23-1, colon cancer cells do not spread as much. This also affects several proteins known to make a cancer cell invasive, demonstrating that the protein is an important potential target for cancer therapies.

The researchers also looked at another protein that influences cell survival, migration, and invasion, called ERK, which has higher activity in cancer cells. Lowering the levels of km23-1, reduced ERK activation. Decreased ERK activity relates to the production of TGF-beta and cell movement.

“If we can block km23-1, we can stop the spread of colon cancer earlier,” Mulder says. “But we would also affect other important functions of the protein. In order to address this issue, we are now trying to find the specific partners of km23-1 that contribute to the invasion of the cancer cells. Then we can design more precise therapeutic agents that target critical regions of km23-1 rather than eliminating the entire protein.”

Researchers used a cell model that represents a unique class of colon cancer that needs further study. The model features cells that move as groups, and not singularly.

“The type of cell movement, or migration, has important implications with respect to the detection of tumor cells in the blood of cancer patients, as well as for the development of new treatments,” Mulder says.

The National Institutes of Health and, in part, a Pennsylvania Department of Health CURE grant supported this study.

Source: Penn State

Click here for the complete issue.

NEWS CRUNCH  
news Accuron Technologies' MedTech Division Invests into AWAK Technologies
news Philips introduces PerformanceBridge suite of operational performance improvement software and services for radiology departments
news Give a Gift that Will Last a Lifetime this Holiday Season with Smile Train
PR NEWSWIRE  
Asia Pacific Biotech News
EDITORS' CHOICE  

Lady Ganga: Nilza'S Story
COLUMNS  
Subscribe to APBN E-Newsletter
Find us under 'Others' option to receive APBN e-newsletters thrice a month!

APBN Editorial Calendar 2017
January:
Lungs & Respiratory System
February:
Cancer Research, Treatment/Technology
March:
Traditional Chinese Medicines
April:
Diabetics Technology
May:
The Piece of Your Mind - Brain Health/Science
June:
Featuring Biotech Start-Ups/Companies
July:
Food Science & Technology
August:
Eye Care/ Eye Health
September:
No. 1 Killer - Heart Diseases, Diagnosis and Treatment
October:
Skin Diseases/Allergic Reactions
November:
Diseases threatening our Children
December:
Liver Health & Treatment/Technology
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
– Editor: Carmen, Jia Wen Loh
MAGAZINE TAGS
About Us
Events
Available issues
Editorial Board
Letters to Editor
Instructions to Authors
Advertise with Us
CONTACT
World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.
5 Toh Tuck Link, Singapore 596224
Tel: 65-6466-5775
Fax: 65-6467-7667
» For Editorial Enquiries:
   biotech_edit@wspc.com or Ms Carmen
» For Subscriptions, Advertisements &
   Media Partnerships Enquiries:
   biotech_ad@wspc.com
Copyright© 2016 World Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd  •  Privacy Policy