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LATEST UPDATES » Vol 22, No 05, May 2018 – Dental health - The root to good health       » Drugs to watch 2018       » Dragonfly-inspired nano coating kills bacteria upon contact       » New compound improves stroke recovery in monkeys and mice       » Cancer stem cell therapy breakthrough       » Draft genome of tea plant sequenced      
BIOBOARD - EUROPE
Shaping the stem cell genome
Stem cell genes seek each other in the cell nucleus. So a study by the Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht, the Netherlands, has found, published in Nature. “It's a new way of looking at DNA.”

Prof. Dr. Wouter de Laat of the Hubrecht Institute and his colleagues have shown that DNA strings in embryonic stem cells are folded in a unique manner. The DNA appears to be folded in such a way that all ‘stem cell genes’ are located close to each other. The activity of these genes ensures that stem cells remain stem cells and they do not change into other types of cells.

The so-called stem cell factors are responsible for the special DNA folding in embryonic stem cells. These are proteins that can only be found in stem cells and with which normal cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells. Without these proteins, stem cells lose their unique DNA folding. The proteins attach to DNA strings in various places and ‘pull’ the strings together.

“We don’t know exactly why these genes have to be so close to each other”, says De Laat. “But of course it's entirely possible that this will allow the stem cell genes to be sequenced in an improved and more stable manner. It makes stem cells more robust.”

The findings by De Laat and his colleagues underline the importance of the three-dimensional organization of DNA strings. It was previously thought that only the sequence of the genetic letters in the DNA was important. But it seems that it is important for genes with a comparable role to literally be close to each other. “This is a new way of looking at DNA. The spatial organization of the DNA actually forms an additional control layer.”

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APBN Editorial Calendar 2018
January:
Obesity / Outlook for 2018
February:
Searching for the fountain of youth
March:
Women in Science - Making a difference
April:
Digestive health in the 21st century - Trust your guts
May:
Dental health - The root to good health
June:
Oncology / Biotech landscape in APAC
July:
Water management / Vaccination
August:
Regenerative medicine / Biotech start ups
September:
Digital healthcare / 3D printing
October:
Bones / Breast cancer
November:
Liver health / Top science research nations & institutions
December:
AIDS / Breakthrough of the year/Emerging trends
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
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