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BIOBOARD - AUSTRALIA
E. coli jabs toxin into gut cells

Scientists have figured out how virulent E. coli bacteria block a pathway that would normally protect the gut from infection.

These infections are particularly serious in young children and can result in diarrhea and other complications such as kidney damage.

The role of this pathway in fighting gut infection was previously unknown but defects in it are associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

The research, published in Nature, improves our understanding of what happens when this pathway doesn’t work as well as it should, says lead author Professor Elizabeth Hartland from the University of Melbourne’s microbiology and immunology department.

“This research provides a model where we can look at how these bacteria switch off a critical pathway in our body that helps fight infection and contributes to normal intestinal function,” she says.

“Using this fundamental knowledge, we can conduct further studies and work towards improving therapies and treatments for people with inflammatory bowel disease, which affects around 5 million people worldwide.”

The researchers found the diarrhea-causing bacteria use a needle-like structure to inject a toxin into the gut cell that blocks cell death. This allows the bacteria to survive and spread in the gut, causing a range of diseases.

The injected toxin paralyzes the infected cell’s ability to send messages to immune cells that would normally sense and eliminate dangerous microbes from the body as well as alert the broader immune system to mount a response to the infection.

“This is a significant contribution to global research in this field as the role of this pathway in intestinal defense and the way bacteria go about blocking this pathway was not known.”

Diarrheal infections are predominantly a problem in developing countries where sanitation is poor, yet cases of virulent E. coli also occur in developed countries.

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EDITORS' CHOICE  

Primates in Biomedical Research
COLUMNS  
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APBN Editorial Calendar 2016
January:
Guest Editorial - Biotechnology In Korea
February:
Guest Editorial - Biomedical Research Governance
March:
Guest Editorial - Life-Saving Opportunities: A Guide to Regenerative Medicine
April:
Cancerology / Oncology
May:
Guest Editorial - Antibody Informatics In Japan
June:
Medical Devices and Technology
July:
Water Technology
August:
Occupational Health
September:
Olympics: Evolution of Sports
October:
Respiratory: Seasonal flu viruses
November:
Tobacco Smoking
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
– Editor: Carmen, Jia Wen Loh
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