HOME ABOUT CONTACT AVAILABLE ISSUES SUBSCRIBE MEDIA & ADS CONFERENCE CALENDAR
LATEST UPDATES » Volume 20, No. 8, August 2016 – Novel Technologies for Antibody Drug Discovery in Japan       » Global Experts Convene to Discuss China's Plan for Diabetes Prevention and Rehabilitation in 2016       » Butterflies Offer Climate Scientists Ecological Insights       » Thermal Stability of Camelid Single Domain VHH Antibody       » That Gut Feeling: How A Healthy Digestive System Has Everything To Do With It       » World Heart Day - At the Heart of Health      
BIOBOARD - UK
Developing World Faces Breast Cancer Surge, Study Suggests

Rising breast cancer incidence and mortality represent a significant and growing threat for the developing world, according to a new global study commissioned by GE Healthcare.

“The report findings suggest that a worryingly high proportion of women are still dying from breast cancer across the world and this seems to correlate strongly with access to breast screening programs and expenditure on healthcare.”

Explained report co-author Bengt Jönsson, Professor in Health Economics at the Stockholm School of Economics: “Breast cancer is on the rise across developing nations, mainly due to the increase in life expectancy and lifestyle changes such as women having fewer children, as well as hormonal intervention such as post-menopausal hormonal therapy. In these regions mortality rates are compounded by the later stage at which the disease is diagnosed, as well as limited access to treatment, presenting a ’ticking time bomb’ which health systems and policymakers in these countries need to work hard to defuse.”

Need for Better Consumer Education

The report on ‘the prevention, early detection and economic burden of breast cancer’ suggests that consumer understanding about breast cancer and screening methods is putting lives at risk in the developing world. For example, a recent survey1 in Mexico City indicated many women feel uncomfortable or worried about having a mammogram.

Commented Claire Goodliffe, Global Oncology Director for GE Healthcare: “It is of great concern that women in newly industrialized countries are reluctant to get checked out until it is too late. This is why GE is working with a number of governments and health ministries in these regions to expand access to screening and improve consumer awareness. Some of these initiatives are making excellent progress.”

Years of Healthy Life Lost

The study draws some interesting conclusions about the impact of breast cancer on sufferers’ lives. According to the most recent published data, 15 million years of ‘healthy life’ were lost worldwide in 2008 due to women dying early or being ill with the disease2. ‘Healthy life lost’ is defined by years lost due to premature death and being incapacitated by the effects of breast cancer. Women in Africa, China and the USA lost the most years of healthy life. Furthermore, of the 15 million years lost globally, more than 3 times as many years were lost due to dying than being ill with the disease, For women in Africa, Russia, Mexico, Turkey and Saudi Arabia, the number of healthy years lost due to death were up to 7 times greater than elsewhere in the world.

Said Bengt Jönsson: “The report findings suggest that a worryingly high proportion of women are still dying from breast cancer across the world and this seems to correlate strongly with access to breast screening programs and expenditure on healthcare.”

He went on to highlight the distinct lack of accurate and current data in areas like breast cancer incidence and mortality, the economic burden of the disease, and detailed patient-linked data on outcomes in relation to treatment patterns and stage of diagnosis. “This limits analyses of how changes in clinical practice affect patient outcomes and needs to be addressed,” he said.

As Mortality Falls, Quality of Life is An Issue

As breast cancer incidence rates have steadily increased in developed countries over the last 50 years, it is no surprise that the main focus of treatment has been survival. However as more women are now living with the disease, the report suggests that quality of life is becoming a growing issue as survival rates improve. As a result doctors are urged to focus on measuring the impact of diagnosis and treatment on survivors’ quality of life to identify what problems patients may have and how these can be mitigated.

Concluded Claire Goodliffe: “This report finds a direct link between survival rates in countries and the stage at which breast cancer is diagnosed. It provides further evidence of the need for early detection and treatment which we welcome given current controversies about the relative harms, benefits and cost effectiveness of breast cancer screening.”

Source: Business Wire

Click here for the complete issue.

NEWS CRUNCH  
news CPhI's Pre-Connect Congress outlines current trends in pharma
news World Population Day 2016
news NUS Student Clinches Top Prize at National Smart Mapping Competition with Cutting-Edge Food Security Solution
PR NEWSWIRE  
Asia Pacific Biotech News
EDITORS' CHOICE  

Lady Ganga: Nilza'S Story
COLUMNS  
Subscribe to APBN E-Newsletter
Find us under 'Others' option to receive APBN e-newsletters thrice a month!

APBN Editorial Calendar 2016
January:
Guest Editorial - Biotechnology In Korea
February:
Guest Editorial - Biomedical Research Governance
March:
Guest Editorial - Life-Saving Opportunities: A Guide to Regenerative Medicine
April:
Leading-Edge ONCOLOGY
May:
Healthcare Systems & Policies in Asia
June:
Medical Devices & Healthcare Technology
July:
Water Technology and Management
August:
Novel Technologies for Antibody Drug Discovery in Japan
September:
Infectious Diseases
October:
Medical Tourism
November:
Big Data in Healthcare
December:
Evidence-based TCM
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
– Editor: Carmen, Jia Wen Loh
MAGAZINE TAGS
About Us
Events
Available issues
Editorial Board
Letters to Editor
Instructions to Authors
Advertise with Us
CONTACT
World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.
5 Toh Tuck Link, Singapore 596224
Tel: 65-6466-5775
Fax: 65-6467-7667
» For Editorial Enquiries:
   biotech_edit@wspc.com or Ms Carmen
» For Subscriptions, Advertisements &
   Media Partnerships Enquiries:
   biotech_ad@wspc.com or Mr Edward
Copyright© 2016 World Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd  •  Privacy Policy