The Preferred Biotech Resource in Asia-Pacific
Vol 19, No 07, July 2015
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INSIDE INDUSTRY
University Hospital of Iceland and Kerecis to collaborate on tissue-regeneration research
Kerecis Limited, an emerging leader in tissue-regeneration materials, and the University Hospital of Iceland will collaborate on tissue-regeneration research, starting with research on scarring.

The first research project will be an assessment of skin scarring on donor wound sites after surgical transplants using the Kerecis MariGen Omega3 tissue-regeneration product. Further trials are planned in areas such as chronic wound repair, hernia repair, dura repair and breast reconstruction.

The first Kerecis product, MariGen Omega3 Wound is indicated for the management of chronic wounds including diabetic, vascular and other hard-to-heal wounds. The product is produced in Iceland from fish locally harvested in the North Atlantic waters. MariGen Omega3 Wound is available for sale in Iceland, the UK and several Middle Eastern markets. The company will soon be expanding distribution to other markets.

MariGen Omega3 products are intact, decellularized fish skin sheets that have had all cells and antigenic materials removed. Fish skin is largely made from the same material as human skin, with the addition of Omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

When inserted into or onto damaged human tissue, the MariGen Omega3 products recruit the body's own cells, are incorporated into the wound, and ultimately are converted into functional, living tissue.

Dr. Pall Matthiasson (MD), Chief Executive, University Hospital of Iceland said, "The University Hospital is committed to advancing medical science. Kerecis is an emerging leader in the field of tissue reconstruction. We hope that collaborating with them will make new and improved medical products available to solve unmet clinical needs globally."

Dr. Baldur Tumi Baldursson (PhD) (MD), Kerecis Medical Director said, "We are working to establish the MariGen Omega3 material platform as the biomaterial of choice across multiple medical operations where synthetic mesh has traditionally been used. The research collaboration with the University Hospital will make it easier for us to start and execute new trials."

Dr. Hilmar Kjartansson (MD), Kerecis Director for Clinical R&D said, "The first clinical trial that we will execute under this collaboration agreement is a study of scarring in donor site wounds where skin has been removed to transplant to other sites on the body. We have seen indications in earlier trials that scarring has been reduced, and hope to show a statistical benefit when compared to standard treatment in this trial."

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