The Preferred Biotech Resource in Asia-Pacific
Vol 19, No 07, July 2015
Biotech in China
Kh-biotech cover

Featured
Interviews

Eye on China

Columns

Conferences ListingConferences
Listing

e-alerts
Pharma Sales
BIOBOARD - EUROPE
Teesside University pioneering life-saving research

Life-saving research to provide early detection of an illness which kills millions of people each year is being pioneered by academics at Teesside University.

The £1.3 million CE-microArray project, which is being coordinated by Teesside University and includes eight other European academic and SME partners, has the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of time it takes to diagnose patients at risk of developing sepsis.

Sepsis is caused by the body's overreaction to an infection and can be triggered either directly by infection or may occur after medical treatment or surgery.

It is estimated that it is the cause of approximately half a million deaths in Europe each year.

Current methods of diagnosing can take up to 72 hours.

In cases of severe sepsis, an earlier diagnosis which leads to the start of antibiotic treatment by just one hour could lead to a 6–10% reduction in mortality rates.

The CE-microArray project plans to use 'cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy' to provide more sensitive, reliable and speedier diagnoses of patients at risk of developing sepsis.

The technique involves improving the sensitivity of blood tests which are based on the absorption of light by passing light many times through the sample.

This could lead to a test which could be up to 100 times more sensitive than conventional testing.

The project is being coordinated by Dr Meez Islam, a Reader in Physical Chemistry in the School of Science & Engineering at Teesside University.

One of the SME partners in the project is Anasyst, a company specializing in novel analytical systems which was spun out of Teesside University research.

Dr Islam said: "We've seen that this testing can work in specialized cases and anything that can speed up the diagnosis times and start treatment earlier, even by a small amount, could potentially save thousands of lives each year.

"In the United States alone, the cost of treatment as a result of hospitalization for sepsis is thought to be about $17 billion annually so it could have a huge benefit for healthcare budgets as well."

Professor Zulf Ali, the Dean of Teesside University's Graduate Research School, and CEO of Anasyst, added: "This is an extremely prestigious project which showcases the high quality research which is done at Teesside and the way in which we can work with the healthcare industry to provide practical solutions to global problems."

Source: PR Newswire

Click here for the complete issue.