HOME ABOUT CONTACT AVAILABLE ISSUES SUBSCRIBE MEDIA & ADS
LATEST UPDATES » Vol 24, No. 10, October 2020 – Artificial Intelligence Technologies — Helping the Fight Against COVID-19s       » Improving Sensitivity of Optical Receivers for Space Communication       » Genetic Variants Identified for the Susceptibility to Neuroblastoma       » Novo Nordisk Launches New Treatment for Diabetes in Singapore       » SMART Researchers Find New Way to Make Bacteria More Sensitive to Antibiotics       » Study Finds Liver Injury to be Common Among COVID-19 Patients      
Vol 22, No. 05, May 2018   |   Issue PDF view/purchase
EDITOR'S LETTER
Breathe easy

Each year, the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) declares May as the National Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month, and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) has set May 1 as World Asthma Day. Chances are, we probably know a family member, friend, co-worker who suffers from asthma.

Because May is a peak season for those with asthma and allergies, it is fitting we feature an asthma article - A recent Australian research found that asthma may be associated with an increased possibility of childhood bone fractures, especially for boys.

According to the 2018 Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention report by GINA, asthma has different underlying disease processes, some of the most common include allergic asthma, non-allergic asthma, late-onset asthma and asthma with obesity. Asthma is more common in boys than girls, prior to puberty. After 14 years, some adults, especially women, present with asthma for the first time in adult life. Obesity also increases the likelihood of developing asthma.

Recently, a plague of toxic caterpillars in London were found to trigger fatal asthma attacks, vomiting and skin rashes. The caterpillars were from a type of moths called oak processionary moths (OPM) and they feed on oak leaves. These OPM caterpillars are furry-looking, and the protein in their hair follicles can trigger serious allergic reactions, posing a particular risk to asthma sufferers, of whom there are more than 5.4 million in the UK. The protein can remain active on the ground for up to five years after being shed.

Although asthma cannot be cured, it can be controlled. This involves both the patient and healthcare providers. A clean environment, an understanding of triggers, timely medication, physical activity and healthy eating are key to avoiding asthma. Most of all, there needs to be more awareness.

As a common and chronic respiratory disease that affects about 300 million people worldwide, this disease impacts our economic well-being, from visits to the emergency department, to absence from school and work. There is no panacea for those who suffer from asthma. Breathe easy, National Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month is worth recognizing as we raise awareness of this chronic condition.


Lim Guan Yu
APBN Editor
You can reach me at gylim@wspc.com

 

You can always access all APBN's issues on our website: www.asiabiotech.com.
Check us out at Facebook @Asia Pacific Biotech News, Instagram @asiabiotech, or follow us on Twitter @asia_biotech.

 

NEWS CRUNCH  
news PharmaSources Launches the Export-Driven Event CPhI & P-MEC China E-Trade Season
news PharmaSources.com to Help Propel the Chinese API Export Business with E-Trade Session CPhI China Top API Exporters & Products
news Singapore Biomedical Company Appointed as a Certified Service Provider by 10x Genomics
news Proteona Honoured with "one to watch" Prize in the Inaugural Spinoff Prize by Nature Research and Merck Grou
SPOTLIGHT  

MAGAZINE TAGS
About Us
Events
Available issues
Editorial Board
Letters to Editor
Contribute to APBN
Advertise with Us
CONTACT
World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.
5 Toh Tuck Link, Singapore 596224
Tel: 65-6466-5775
Fax: 65-6467-7667
» For Editorial Enquiries:
   biotech_edit@wspc.com or Ms Deborah Seah
» For Subscriptions, Advertisements &
   Media Partnerships Enquiries:
   biotech_ad@wspc.com
Copyright© 2020 World Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd  •  Privacy Policy